WMIC

I am playing virtual tennis with Shawn today and he scored his first point with this (the game is at 15-40)

In the past I have used ScriptomaticV2 or wbemtest to test WMI or get vbscript to dump WMI data.  Shawn showed me WMIC and I am very impressed.  It’s not as good as using Windows PowerShell, but it is good.

So if you using a Windows XP, Vista or Windows 2003 you can run WMIC at the command line.

By default it will connect to rootCIMv2 and your can use /? to list all the options you have.  It really is quite nice, but the commands are a bit of a pain to work out.

So typing process is the same as PATH win32_process

What I have not been able to work out yet is how to access rootMicrosoftExchangeV2 from WMIC shell.

It’s simple if you use the WMIC command line.  If you want to know the Exchange_QueueData you just run

WMIC /NAMESPACE:\rootMicrosoftExchangeV2 path Exchange_Queue

Kewl … enjoy!

 

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Is your email compliant with the (UK) Companies Act?

Ewan post this today, and it’s very interesting .. every day is a school day!  I had better update my email footer and website then :-|


Source: http://blogs.technet.com/ewan/archive/2007/03/22/is-your-email-compliant-with-the-uk-companies-act.aspx

semi little-known fact… as of the 1st January 2007, the rules for UK companies regarding business stationery changed. Just like every registered company is bound to include certain information (the registered office, the geography of registration (eg England & Wales) and its company registration number) on all its official letters & order forms, electronic communications now fall under this rule.


Source: http://www.companieshouse.gov.uk/promotional/busStationery.shtml

Changes to business stationery rules

As from 1st January 2007 the following applies to –

Business Stationery
Whether in hard copy, electronic or any other form:

A company must state its name, in legible lettering, on the following –

  • all the company’s business letters, order forms;
  • all its notices and other official publications;
  • all bills of exchange, promissory notes, endorsements, cheques and orders for money or goods purporting to be signed by, or on behalf of, the company;
  • all its bills of parcels, invoices, receipts and letters of credit
  • on all its websites

On all of its business letters, order forms or any of the company’s web sites, the company must show in legible lettering –

  • its place of registration
  • registered number
  • its registered office address
  • and if it is being wound up, that fact,

Whenever an email is used where its paper equivalent would be caught by the stationery requirements then that email is also subject to the requirements

The above also applies to Limited Liability Partnerships


The register posted this last year: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/12/21/new_web_email_regulation/

Companies to update websites and email footers before 2007

… For websites, contrary to the fears of some, the specified information does not need to appear on every page. Again, many websites will already list the required information, perhaps on their “About us” or “Legal info” pages.

… It is not sufficient to include a ‘contact us’ form without also providing an email address and geographic address somewhere easily accessible on the site. A PO Box is unlikely to suffice as a geographic address; but a registered office address would. If the business is a company, the registered office address must be included.


This is really good, and has a good example
http://www.exclaimer.com/EUregulation_UK.aspx

Legal requirements for email footers.  This is a good example:

1) Mandatory information
If your business is a private or public limited company or a Limited Liability Partnership, the Companies Act 1985 requires your letterhead, order forms and all business emails to include the following details in legible characters:

  • Your company registration number;
  • Your place of registration (e.g. Scotland or England & Wales); and
  • Your registered office addres

This information should also appear on your company’s website. Failure to comply with these requirements puts your company at risk of a fine. These duties were clarified on 1 January 2007, as a result of an amendment that was made to the Companies Act to comply with a European Directive. For avoidance of doubt, these details are not required of sole traders or standard partnerships.

2) Optional information: confidentiality notices
3) Optional information: disclaimers
4) Optional information: monitoring

The New Jersey Barrier

Now this is a damm good idea!.  Also when I was in India, I read an article about a way to generate electricity from the motion of cars on a road!. 


Source: http://www.metropolismag.com/cda/story.php?artid=2466

How many speeding cars does it take to power a lightbulb? For Mark Oberholzer, a runner-up in the 2006 Metropolis Next Generation Design Competition, this might not be such an absurd question. His project proposed integrating ­turbines into the barriers between highway lanes that would harness the wind generated by passing cars to create energy. “Opposing streams of traffic create really incredible potential in terms of a guaranteed wind source,” Oberholzer says.

His research is aptly timed—wind is rapidly gaining attention as a sustainable power source with serious potential to feed America’s insatiable appetite for energy. General Electric, a leader in the industry, is experiencing unprecedented demand for its turbines, and although North America has been slower to adopt the technology than Europe, its wind industry is growing at an average rate of about 17 percent each year. “The United States is catching up very quickly,” GE Energy’s Robert Gleitz says. “I think if the country continues to install around the rate of three or three-and-a-half gigawatts per year, it will become one of the leading countries in wind.” In response to the corresponding need for trained professionals, the School of Engineering Techno­logy and Applied Science in Toronto’s Centennial College launched the Centennial Energy Institute last October to educate students in developing and maintaining systems for power generation using the resources of the landscape.

about air travel

Okay so this weekend we flew up to Inverness for a Wedding.  The weather was nice and the drive from Inverness to Helmsdale was long, but the scernery is breath taking.

Anyway, coming back on Sunday we stop off at the great little farm shop.  We get some Haggis, White & Black Pudding and some organic free range eggs.

So we get Inverness airport and with our cool bag of goodies and get told that we can’t take the eggs on the Plane!, but everything else is okay (as long as it’s vacumed packed.  Note to self, make sure terrorists dont buy a vacum pack machine!)

WHAT we say, you have got be joking .. the guys says nope … okay so we asked why and the says “Bird Flu“.  Now we know that is a load of BS, he probably fancied an egg sandwich for lunch.  We said, okay, but if we drove or took the train we would be able to take these, what is special about a plane?

He couldn’t answer, so we left out Eggs at Inverness airport and vowed never to fly internally in the UK again

<RANT> about air travel </RANT>

Okay so this weekend we flew up to Inverness for a Wedding.  The weather was nice and the drive from Inverness to Helmsdale was long, but the scernery is breath taking.

Anyway, coming back on Sunday we stop off at the great little farm shop.  We get some Haggis, White & Black Pudding and some organic free range eggs.

So we get Inverness airport and with our cool bag of goodies and get told that we can’t take the eggs on the Plane!, but everything else is okay (as long as it’s vacumed packed.  Note to self, make sure terrorists dont buy a vacum pack machine!)

WHAT we say, you have got be joking .. the guys says nope … okay so we asked why and the says “Bird Flu“.  Now we know that is a load of BS, he probably fancied an egg sandwich for lunch.  We said, okay, but if we drove or took the train we would be able to take these, what is special about a plane?

He couldn’t answer, so we left out Eggs at Inverness airport and vowed never to fly internally in the UK again

All hail the Java-based x86 emulator

Shawn just sent me this.  


Source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/03/23/java_emulator/ and http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/jpc/index.html

Researchers at Oxford have built an x86 emulator that runs purely on Java, making it ideal for security researchers who want to analyze and archive viruses, host honeypots and defend themselves against buggy or malicious software without hosing their machines. The JPC also emulates a host of other environments, giving technophiles the ability to play Asteroids and other software that’s sat on shelves for years collecting dust.

JPC is a pure Java emulation of an x86 PC with fully virtual peripherals. It runs anywhere you have a JVM, whether x86, RISC, mobile phone, set-top box, possibly even your refrigerator! All this, with the bulletproof security and stability of Java technology.

This is my favorite screen dump .. a Nokia booting MsDos!

WMI Explorer

Yeah yeah I hear you say I can use Scriptomatic so what is new .. Well Marc aka MOW aka the PowerShell Guy has just blogged a WMI Explorer written in Windows PowerShell.

How Damm cool is this! 

Source: http://thepowershellguy.com/blogs/posh/archive/2007/03/22/powershell-wmi-explorer-part-1.aspx

You dont get the script samples like scriptomatic (you dont need samples!), but it is a very good way to look at the WMI classes you have on your system.

Check it out NOW!

Proposed Merger Of Taylor Woodrow And George Wimpey

Interesting Mr Bond .. I wonder what will happen with the construction business, as Wimpey is mainly Homes now after it sold it’s consutction business to Tarmac and then Carillion … Humm Oh you might be asking why have I published this .. well a long time ago I used to work for Wimpey Construction!


Source: http://www.taylorwoodrow.com/presscontent.asp?ArtID=213

Date: 26 March 2007: The Boards of Taylor Woodrow plc (“Taylor Woodrow”) and George Wimpey Plc (“George Wimpey”) are pleased to announce today that they have reached agreement on the terms of a recommended all-share merger (the “Merger”) to create Taylor Wimpey plc (“Taylor Wimpey”). Taylor Wimpey will be the UK’s largest housebuilding group with combined pro forma annual revenues of over £6.7 billion, total UK house completions of approximately 22,000 per annum, total North American house completions of approximately 9,000 per annum and a combined market capitalisation of approximately £5 billion.

Summary

The Merger will enhance shareholder value by creating a business with a strong strategic position in both the UK and the chosen markets in North America. The Combined Group has a pro forma landbank of over 92,000 plots in the UK and will be strengthened in the US through the combination of operations across some of the most attractive US markets. In addition, shareholders of the Combined Group will also benefit from enhanced profitability through the delivery of significant cost savings.